Hope Masike wants to make a difference

One of Zimbabwe’s most travelled and decorated female mbira musicians, Hope Masike, has a dream to make a positive impact on as many people’s lives as possible. She wants to use mbira music to break religious barriers in the quest to touch souls across the globe.

Hope Masike.
Hope Masike.

She wants to citizens around the world embrace and preserve their respective cultures in the face of radical cultural change. On the music stage she promises to dance good and hard.

In 2011 she taught African Music in Norway for a year. The song-writer, mbira player and dancer rolled into one package plays a blend of ancient traditional mbira classics and jazz driven instruments popularly known as world music or mbira-fusion.

Masike studied Applied Art and Design, Fine Art and Music at the Zimbabwe School of Music. She has defied all odds to come up with several albums. In 2008 she founded her own seven-member band, The following year saw her debut album “Hope” hit the charts.

“I have always loved to identify with our African culture and of all the instruments, the mbira suited my expectations perfectly well,” she said in a recent interview.

“I continue enjoying the challenges associated with the redefining of mbira, its rebranding from the so-called ‘pagan’ instrument as it was labelled, to an instrument that people could play as a means of self-expression,” she said.

Masike said God helped her overcome occupational challenges and other hurdles. She was nominated Outstanding Female Musician for 2012 National Arts and Musical Awards, the International Artist for Zimbabwe Achievers’ Awards 2014, and the Best Collaboration for 2013 for Songlines Music Awards 2014 with Monoswezi (the Norwegian band she played with).

She was recently among the judges at ‘Sing your way to Paris 2014 competition’ held in Harare. Music took her to events such as the Harare International Festival of Arts, Shoko Festival, Barefeet Festival in Zambia, Arts Alive in South Africa and the Exit Festival in Serbia.

Masike has also been in Mozambique, Norway, France, Netherlands, Germany, London, Swaziland and the United States of America on musical business.

Every Tuesday she would be the resident artist at the Harare Book Café.

Under her sleeve, Masike has another gem of an album ‘Love and Chocolate’ among dozens others. Sibanda One of Zimbabwe’s arguably most travelled and decorated female mbira musician, Hope Masike, has a dream to reach as many people as is possible and make a positive impact in their lives. Through mbira music, Masike would do her best to grace as many public events as is possible and break religious barriers in the quest to touch souls across the globe.

She would help citizens from around the world embrace and preserve their respective cultures in the face of potential radical cultural changes.

She would bring and maintain pride to everything she represents on the continent, country, small communities, family and globally.

On the music stage she promises to dance good and hard.

As part of her musical voyage to reach all corners of the world, Masike, once relocated to Norway in 2011 and taught African Music at Kultureskolen I Fredrikstad for a year.

She would regularly stage live shows around Norway.

In collaboration with other international artists, her message went far afield through an album, Village.

The song-writer, mbira player and dancer rolled into one package, plays a blend of ancient traditional mbira classics and jazz driven instruments popularly known as world music or mbira-fusion.

Masike who studied Applied Art and Design, Fine Art and Music at the Zimbabwe School of Music, is a rising star who has defied all odds to come up with several albums in her name.

She told The Zimbabwean that she was motivated into mbira music by the love for the African history and cultural aspects around the instrument.

“I have always loved to identify with our African culture and of all the instruments, the mbira suited my expectations perfectly well.

“I continue enjoying the challenges associated with the redefining of mbira, its rebranding from the so-called ‘pagan’ instrument as it was labelled, to an instrument that people could play as a means of self expression,” she said.

Masike said God helped her mount occupational challenges and other hurdles.

She admires all mbira players who came before her as ‘they managed to play one of the most difficult but trendy musical instruments around’.

Occasionally, Masike would play live mbira and vocal performances of national anthems at national days of different countries at their embassies in Zimbabwe.

For her efforts, Masike has won several awards. She was nominated Outstanding Female Musician for 2012 National Arts and Musical Awards, nominated for the International Artist for Zimbabwe Achievers’ Awards 2014, nominated with Monoswezi (Norwegian band she played with) for the Best Collaboration for 2013 for Songlines Music Awards 2014.

She was recently among the judges at ‘Sing your way to Paris 2014 competition’ held in Harare on Friday, March 21, 2014.

She is the resident artist at the Harare Book Café every Tuesday.

Post published in: Entertainment

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *