Mudhala Wethu Gala in Goli

Mudhala Wethu Gala in Goli
BY ZAKEUS CHIBAYA

JOHANNESBURG - Mthwakazi Forum, a network of Zimbabweans based in South Africa, is going to hold a public gala for the late Vice President and founder of the Zimbabwe Africa People’s Union, Joshua Nkomo on July 1 at Holy T

rinity Church in Braamfontein, to celebrate the illustrious life of ‘Father Zimbabwe’.

Organisers dismissed the annual Nkomo gala, organised by Zanu (PF) in Bulawayo as ‘propaganda’, as the government usually provided a one-sided story about Joshua Nkomo and his participation in ZAPU was omitted or twisted.

“We are holding this gala at a time when Zimbabwe is facing a lot of problems emanating from lack of leadership both in government and in the opposition,” said Mlamuli Mhlaba Nkomo, Director of Mthwakazi Forum.

“By holding this gala we wish to resurrect the revolutionary spirit of unselfishness in pursuit of national and democratic ideals. Nkomo was judged by tribal lenses that resulted in undeserving candidates like Robert Mugabe whose membership to the majority ethnic group proved to be his main political weapon.

The Forum urged the South African government to revise its relations with the Mugabe regime as they reflected the life of ‘Chibwe chitedza’.

“Nkomo was an African leader not only a Zimbabwean leader. He formed alliances with the ANC and its military wing Umkhonto WeSizwe (MK). It is on the basis of this relationship that we call upon the South African government to rethink its alliance with Mugabe which has brought more misery to Zimbabweans,” said Nkomo During early 1980s, Nkomo clashed with Mugabe and was expelled with his party ZAPU from the government. After the sacking, Mugabe unleashed Gukurahundi in Matebeleland and parts of Midlands in a bid to crush Nkomo. Thousands of people died in the civil war, led by Mugabe’s notorious Fifth Bridgade. Nkomo had to flee the country to seek refugee.

In order to stop the massacre of his people he agreed that his party be assimilated into Zanu (PF) in what is known as the Unity Agreement in 1987.

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