Roadside markets thrive

Economic hardships are forcing many unemployed people here into informal jobs like vending. They set up their stalls in undesignated areas such as street corners and bus stations.

Roadside vendors selling tomatoes, sofas and wardrobes near the Budiriro 1 shops.
Roadside vendors selling tomatoes, sofas and wardrobes near the Budiriro 1 shops.

“This is not an auction floor. We bring our wares here to sell. Our stuff ranges from wardrobes, kitchen units, stoves and fridges to tomatoes, cabbages and onions,” said a city-centre vendor, Mildred Matamba, who plies her trade near the Budiriro 1 Shopping Centre.

“This place is strategic because many people pass through here on their way to town, to the nearby clinic or to TM Supermarket. We bring fresh fish here to sell to retail outlets, butcheries and supermarkets.

Our prices are far cheaper than the prices charged in the stores. I bought a good second-hand four-plate stove for a paltry $150 from someone who desperately needed money to cover his relative’s funeral expenses.”

The municipal police fight running battles with the vendors, but they are far from winning the war.

To make ends meet, women as young as sixteen can be seen selling roasted mice, boiled eggs, maize and groundnuts in town and around the bars.

Garikai Maodza, who sells airtime at the Glenview 8 bus terminus, said that he must sell at least 100, $1 airtime cards in order to realize a profit of $8.

He is an unemployed graduate with three children in school.

Post published in: News

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