Sekuru Moro leads the way in traditional healing

Sekuru Moyo, as he’s popularly known, became a healer when he was just 15. Since then, his traditional healing skills have earned him certificates and loyal customers during his travels around the world.

“Some bogus healers take advantage of the gullible to initiate bloodshed. I believe that no proper ritual can be made with human blood because our ancestors do not prescribe murder and use of human blood.” – Sekuru Moyo.
“Some bogus healers take advantage of the gullible to initiate bloodshed. I believe that no proper ritual can be made with human blood because our ancestors do not prescribe murder and use of human blood.” – Sekuru Moyo.

“I have been to Nigeria, Kenya, Thailand and many countries in Europe at the request of my clients, or to attend conferences on the use of herbs to heal people,” says Moyo, originally from Makoni but now living in Johannesburg.

“Here in South Africa, I have received some recognition and sponsorship from the government for my work. I have also been involved in a number of programmes for managing HIV/Aids patients since my arrival in 1999.”

His journey to respected traditional healer started from unpromising beginnings.

“Everything came to me as a dream. I tried to fight the calling, but I became disabled for three years, during which time I failed to go to school. Hospitals couldn’t cure me,” he said. “My parents conducted a traditional ceremony that was prescribed by some spirit mediums. I was then called Sekuru Moyo because I belong to the Moyo dynasty of Central Africa. From then on, I began to dream about certain herbs that remained unknown to most traditional healers. I began treating people when I was doing grade six. I would go to school and find scores of people waiting for me when I returned home, so I had to juggle the two parts of my life.”

He tried to change to Christianity, joining one of the apostolic sects in Zimbabwe, but when he vomited blood for some months, he decided he had made a mistake and switched back to his traditional calling.

In 1999, Moyo was invited to South Africa at the request of a family he was helping.

“They wanted to see me expand, so they thought that would be easier here. On arrival, I registered Moyo Herbal Clinic in central Johannesburg and began to manage HIV/AIDS-related illnesses. I also offer counselling on health and social issues there,” he added.

“I do not claim to cure AIDS, but my herbs have been recognised by even those using scientific methods as helpful in managing the condition of those that are HIV-positive.”

Like any other doctor, Moyo keeps records of the progress made by his clients and records all consultations met and missed. He also prescribes traditional diets for them and sells bottled traditional medicine.

At his home, he hosts those facing various spiritual illnesses, social and other life challenges. His long list of clients includes many high-profile people and politicians.

It is in the fight against HIV/AIDS that Moyo has been most active, having attended a number of seminars and conferences on the deadly disease. He attended the ICASA Conference on HIV/AIDS and Sexually Transmitted Infections in Africa and received an award at the Association for the Promotion of Traditional Medicine (PROMETRA) for his clinic’s role in trying to solve the HIV puzzle.

A member of many traditional healings associations, Moyo has also been commended by South Africa’s Indigenous Knowledge Systems Department.

He condemned those who spill blood in the name of traditional healing.

“Some bogus healers take advantage of the gullible to initiate bloodshed. I believe that no proper ritual can be made with human blood because our ancestors do not prescribe murder and use of human blood,” he said.

“Satanism has now taken over the world and most of that has come from the commercialisation of traditional healing. That is why everywhere you go now, you find posters being distributed about traditional healers, who charge a fortune to help someone. That is all very bad because demanding a fortune from someone who is in serious problems is immoral.”

Moyo’s biggest dream is to build a cultural heritage centre in Harare, which would teach people the traditional ways of all the country’s tribes and clans and serve traditional dishes.

Post published in: News
Comments
  1. jimmy

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *